Museums

The Museum Of Tolerance Los Angeles

Where is it at?

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The Museum Of Tolerance
9786 West Pico Blvd
Los Angeles
CA
90035
Tel: 310-553-8403

Where are we going today?

Each year the Museum serves over 300,000visitors, including students, educators, law enforcement officials, corporate professionals, and community members from the USA and around the world.
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What people are saying?

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    Ive called and Ive been and the operator on the phone was just as tudey as the lady guarding the Museum.

    Dont get me wrong the people checking us in and the people strip searching our car were incredibly nice..almost too nice that I ate my words after I met the rude lady at the museum. Geeze...i get it, it was a tough time and we have to show respect and smiles are not free here..
    But goodness gracious it really deters me from ever wanting to come back for future visits.

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    It may not be the best laid-out or run museum but it shows the beginnings of intolerance brilliantly, from the tiniest shrug to full-blown intolerance sanctioned by society. Several intolerable examples – Rwanda’s is only one example - are indeed mentioned and the implication is that each one of us, at any age and all over the world, has to be aware of how our reactions, however slight and non-committal, can grow alarmingly out of control. The Holocaust, or Shoah, is presented in the second part of the tour as the most horrific of all examples:...Read More

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    Mind blowing museum. One voice, many followers and they the innocent suffered. Made me break down. But beautiful thing to learn of history. A well learned lesson we dont ever want to happen again. My sincere condolences to the loss ppl of the holocaust.

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    good if you'd like to visit a jewish propaganda center. if you are planning on going or bringing anyone like your kids, id much rather recommend elie weasel's "night" (about his experience in the holocaust) and "MAUS" a comic book that also tells of people in it by using animals instead of people. approachable for children but it doenst shy away from what happened there.

    if you're planning to get a historical understanding of this era and what lead to it, theres many textbooks and other such information you can get for about the same price.

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    Awesome I love it. Its a great experience for me and my daughters linzi and lexi

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by Linda Hepner

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It may not be the best laid-out or run museum but it shows the beginnings of intolerance brilliantly, from the tiniest shrug to full-blown intolerance sanctioned by society. Several intolerable examples – Rwanda’s is only one example - are indeed mentioned and the implication is that each one of us, at any age and all over the world, has to be aware of how our reactions, however slight and non-committal, can grow alarmingly out of control. The Holocaust, or Shoah, is presented in the second part of the tour as the most horrific of all examples: this is not at all because it is the only devastation in history but what the directors and docents unfortunately know about most and are most capable of teaching. The museum does not specialize in artefacts, though there are upper and lower floors with donated items and long-term exhibitions such as on Anne Frank, and there are numerous events such as films and talks on subjects other than the Holocaust, for instance on the Arab Spring, Native Americans and other peoples, with question-time open to the audience. The point of the museum is to examine individual behavior and how it plays its part in influencing society which if used and taken over by destructive forces – such as but not only the Nazis – one can end up with six million dead and a civilization in ruins. The tour therefore has to be led by a docent and timing is important. If the lesson of the first part of the tour is not forgotten after the tour through the ‘Holocaust’ years, the experience is sobering and yet energizing with our renewed understanding of our selves and society.

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