1. admin

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    Totally awesome, can’t wait to go back. A bricks-and-mortar tribute to the power of culture to honor and teach history to a public audience. Specifically, the culture and history of the pan-Pacific basin. Plus, the bus operator contracted to the resort, Marriott’s Ko Olina, took us to Turtle Bay and Waimea Bay. Totally rad, dude!!!!!

  2. admin

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    We recently visited PCC, and it is surprising good. It was better than expected. There is a big screen movie to show case the scenery of the islands filmed from a plane. There are 8 villages, Hawaii, Tonga, Tahihti, New Zealand, Fiji, etc. and also dance shows on the boats, showing cultural differences as well as similarities of various Polynesian Cultures. There are fun activities such as start a fire, dancing, for kids to participate. Luau was good, and I liked the Poke. PCC is owned by the Mormon Church and most employees, dancers, etc., are part time students at the nearby BYU campus. Shop around for tickets, and you can get a huge discount. Tickets can be used for revisits of the theme park.

  3. admin

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    Seriously PASS on this place, Oahu has so much better to offer.The packages are expensive and confusing. We had to go back to the front desk to purchase a food voucher for the BBQ because they couldn’t process a payment on the spot. The BBQ was terrible. There was flies in all the food selections, a dead fly in salad dressing as well as a hair in the cheese. I don’t believe it would have met the food safety standards. Even the cultural centre itself was a let down. I was expecting to learn more about the different cultures and history. Instead the whole thing felt “dumbed down” while they taught you a phrase or two from the local languages.

  4. admin

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    I came here with a Korean tour group, so my experience would obviously be different from people who came here on their own. This place is a huge tourist attraction for a reason and I would recommend coming here. However, I would recommend doing the dinner/evening show rather than the lunch/tour that our group did. If you book online over 10 days in advance from your visit, you can save 15%.There are four dining options here: New Island Luau, Ali’I Luau, Prime Rib Dining Buffet, and Island Buffet Dining. Our group participated in the Island Buffet Dining. We were seated in their large dining area, which seats around 1K people. The description online says they serve “savory Hawaiian, Asian and mainland entrees, buffet style” with “desserts galore.” LIES. The food was terribly mediocre and there was just four dessert offerings, none of which looked appetising. So I’m not a fan of the food here… but it was included in our entrance fee, so we all ate until we were full.After lunch our group went on an approximately 2 hour long tour with a Korean guide. I had asked if I could go on the English one but it was full so they said my only option was to wander around on my own :/ Korean tour it is then! We rode on a canoe down past all seven villages (which represent the seven Polynesian islands) and then walked by, stopping a few times to either participate in an activity or see a show. We stopped in Hawaii to learn a song on the ukulele and also learn a hula dance. Then we stopped in Tonga to see their presentation on Tongan ta nafa (drumming). Three members of the audience even got to participate, which was fun to watch. The tour ended with everyone going to the IMAX theatre and watching their 14-minute video on Hawaii in 4D. That’s right–the chairs will move/lean forward to make it feel like you really are going through the air and seeing different areas of the islands. It was a pretty cool video to watch.We didn’t get to see their evening show since we left afterwards, but I’ve heard really good things about it and would recommend seeing it if you are coming here. It’s called “Ha: Breath of Life” and takes place from 7:30-9PM daily. The PCC also offers other activities during the day: Maori Poi, Canoe Race, Tahitian Spear Throw, Samoan Cooking, and Fire Making. And it’s great to be able to explore the seven Polynesian islands in one place: Hawaii, Marquesas, Fiji, Tahiti, Tonga, Aotearoa (New Zealand), and Samoa. Each village has their own presentation and activities as well. I kind of wish we had come here independent of the tour group so we could have fully explored this place, but my mum and I still had a good time nonetheless. But with my not being able to understand most of what our tour guide was saying and the food being so mediocre I can’t give them more than three stars…

  5. admin

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    The Polynesian Cultural Center provided me with by far the worst experience I’ve had as a tourist in Hawaii. This place is a huge piggy bank for the Church of Jesus Christ and Latter Day Saints, more commonly known as the Mormons (it’s in the fine print on their brochure). First of all it costs you for parking before you even get into this place, then it costs an arm and a leg for entry, particularly if you are taking the family, and then they slug you again for a meal ticket to eat at the barbecue! Oh and don’t count on being able to have a cool refreshing beer or glass of wine with your meal, this place is run by the church so there’s no alcohol on the premises. The food at the barbecue was quite frankly disgusting, there were flies and bugs all over the available selections which were certainly not traditional Polynesian foods. Moving on… My partner and I were constantly hassled at every turn by people asking if we knew where we were going and trying to convince us to join a tour (don’t do this, you will go insane with boredom). We sat through a couple of shows which were very much generalized and simplified to the point where they contained no real information which was disappointing because that’s why we came to this place, to learn about Polynesian culture and way of life. What we got was far from this, a few dances here and there, some phrases and words and not much else. In the end we cut our losses and got out of there, thoroughly frustrated and annoyed with ourselves for not doing more research on this place. If you wish to hand over your hard earned money to the Mormons just join the church, it’s far easier than going through the pain of visiting the Polynesian Cultural Center.