1. admin

    0.0
    Your rating:

    Very interesting riverboat trip. Reasonable priced hot dogs and sausage on the boat. Stop at village very interesting.

  2. admin

    0.0
    Your rating:

    Where else could one travel in the Northern Hemisphere, to travel back in time, then with a trip on a paddlewheeler. And on a water way used a hundred years ago by our for fathers as a means to move around this Great State as we do with our modern modes of transportation?The trip is great!! Very informative and very afforable considering what it must take to move vessels this size. I give the staff and crew of all the Riverboat Discovery two Thumbs Up!!! Way UP!!………………..

  3. admin

    0.0
    Your rating:

    My family and I recently traveled on a princess cruise And then took the land tour for several days through Alaska. We finished our tour in Fairbanks where we were pushed into going on the El Dorado gold mine tour and also The sternwheeler Riverboat Discovery tour. Both tours were cheap imitations of informative entertainment. I fell asleep on the boat tour because the commentator’s voice was more boring than Bob Ross’s. When we got off the boat at the Chena village we were shuffled around in the mud as some native Alaskan teenagers spoke about a culture they were surely distanced from. I don’t get why anyone would voluntarily go on this tour. If you have a choice skip it and take a nap!!

  4. admin

    0.0
    Your rating:

    It’s shameful that Riverboat Discovery hypes the Iditarod and mushers Susan Butcher and Lance Mackey. Several of Susan Butcher’s dogs died in the Iditarod in her effort to gain fame and fortune. One of the dogs used by Butcher in the 1994 Iditarod died from exertional myopathy, otherwise known as “sudden death syndrome.” Another dog used by her dropped dead in 1987 from internal hemorrhaging. Several were injured and killed by moose. Mackey’s dog “Wolf” died in the 2004 Iditarod when he regurgitated food and choked on it. What happens to dogs during the race includes death, paralysis, frostbite (where it hurts the most!), bleeding ulcers, bloody diarrhea, lung damage, pneumonia, ruptured discs, viral diseases, broken bones, torn muscles and tendons and sprains. At least 142 dogs have died in the race, including two dogs on a doctor’s team who froze to death in the 2009 Iditarod.

  5. admin

    0.0
    Your rating:

    Awesome seeing kids playing in the summer