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    Museums are not usually my favourite places to visit so when I go it is probably to take my family. This museum is different. To start with they don’t put you in a building to look at “things” under glass. Rather, they let you to follow a suggested path through rail cars of various types and ages. This makes the experience more personal and real. You can climb up to the caboose, sit in the various types of passenger trains, and even enter the locomotive while trying to imagine how the men could have worked in such a hot place next to the boiler. I believe that most of the staff are volunteers but that means that they want to be there and it shows. This museum is located just north of Edmonton so it is an easy drive to visit. Rides in the actual train are short and only offered on long weekends but I’m sure that younger children will still find the short ride exciting. This was my second visit to the museum and I would recommend it to anybody for a fun and educational experience. On this visit I went mainly to take photographs as the museum offers endless possibilities for creative images. They have something for everyone including a snack bar and gift shop.

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    This is one of the best rail museums I’ve been to. Most rail museums seem to have an attitude that being open to the public is a necessary inconvenience. Not this one: we arrived 45 minutes before closing time and they stayed open to let us get through the exhibits. The museum offers a unique hands-on view of what railroads were (and are) like. The extensive walk-through “yes you can touch almost everything” tour makes it a real experience. The cost of admission is well below average ($5 per adult), but they could sure do with more money — a lot of stock is in a state of preservation rather than restoration. The entire operation runs on admission charges, donations, and volunteers, without government assistance. Highly recommended.

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