1. Brendan Creane

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    My 10-year-old and I enjoyed the claymation area. This area is definitely more appropriate for older kids since it requires building the clay figures, planning a 10 second video, and carefully animating the still figures over time. As another reviewer mentioned, all the other activities are much too simple for late elementary school kids. This incarnation of the Children’s Creativity Museum is almost identical to the original Zeum back in 1998 – same activities, same layout, same festive wall murals. I wish great success to the CCM’s efforts to fundraise and update the museum – a lot has changed in the past 16 years!

  2. Dallas Strömberg

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    This place was not a great fit for my kid’s ages (18 months and 3.5 years), at least not compared to Bay Area Discovery Museum. They did enjoy the moon dough, giant chalk boards, and magnatiles, but those are all things we can do at home.

  3. Nicole Igudesman

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    I used to go there everyday when I was little and I loved it! This place is amazing

  4. Annabelle Younger

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    Great Children’s playlabs, different take on Children’s Museums

  5. A Google User

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    I have to disagree with the reviews that say the Zeum is for older kids. I was hoping that was true, since I was traveling with a 10-year-old, and it’s often hard to find things for that age group. But the kids having the most fun in the zeum were 5-7 years old. The facilities for making an animation movie looked interesting, but there wasn’t any information on how to get started, and no one around to help. The biggest disappointment was the karaoke, make your own video area, which I had thought was going to be the big hit. But the minute I saw that it was a big public area, with parents and kids watching, I knew it wasn’t going to work. The costumes were all for younger kids, and they didn’t seem to mind dancing around and singing in front of everyone. I had hoped for private booths- we used to have something like that in Nashville. We played for a while with the digital art equipment, but the teenage girl working there wouldn’t let us print out our creations- although we saw the boy take things out of the printer and hand them to people. So we have nothing to take away from the experience. I tried to ask about it, but the two kids were too busy goofing around with each other to be of any help. Overall, a big disappointment.