1. Hollie W

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    Barbican cinema is such a hidden gem. Firstly the Barbican in general is a really interesting place architecturally and they always have interesting exhibitions. There is a cafe restaurant and a bar so you can enjoy a drink before the film, like going to the theatre. But the cinema itself is fantastic – really steep slope so you don’t have to worry about someone tall being in front of you, and the seats are really comfy. Some of the screens are fairly small but that’s nice too, cosy. The best part I half don’t want to advertise, but they have £6 tickets on Mondays. Such a bargain. Shh don’t tell anyone!

  2. Mike Dixson

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    My first time ever riding a horse. We were put on horses sized according to our weight and experience.We were given a short tutorial on how to ‘steer’ and stop the horses, then went round a few times in a paddock to practise those techniques and how to trot.We then went out for a love ride up a hill and across a small gauge railway line where we had a lovely view of the area.The ride was pretty much nose to tail horse following horse lead by one guide and followed up by another. At times we broke into a trot for short spells.It was a very enjoyable first experience for me. I would like to have had some more freestyle time to feel like I was more in control of the horse rather than then just following the horse in front. But an enjoyable experience.

  3. Xander Wood

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    The Barbican Centre is a marvel of cultural architecture. I say ‘marvel’ in a very tentative way, because, like the whole Barbican Estate built around it, it has always divided opinion concerning whether or not it is ‘brilliant’ architecture or ‘horrific’ architecture. I like it, but I always welcome a debate. The Barbican is much like Milton Keynes. It was built an idea of what living in London might be like decades in the future, from the viewpoint of planners in the 60s and 70s. As such, the Barbican Centre was built as a self-contained social hub for the residents of the estate, with the idea that they’d never need to leave the estate, presumably as a result of a nuclear apocalypse or the outbreak of anarchy in the rest of London. Within this bizarre notional shell is actually a very good performance space, with a warm and inviting feel and excellent acoustics. Just don’t expect to be able to find your way in or out with any ease. Every time I have visited the space I have gotten lost. Every. Time. Seriously. And I’ve been going here for 15 years at least. There’s a surprisingly excellent café nestled in here as well, and the 70s aesthetics have slowly but inevitably swung back into fashion again. The programme of events is diverse and ambitious. I would recommend a concert from the London Symphony Chorus or a play from the Royal Shakespeare Company, which both call this space their home. You’re therefore very likely to find yourself here if you want some high-brow performance entertainment in London. I’m sure you’ll enjoy it, even if the decor raises one (or both) of your eyebrows.

  4. Dan F

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    This has many different things you could try and do things. I’ve been a regular of the city library since I was a kid and it’s exceptionally good. It also is home to some great independent gigs (classical or indie or jazz you name it) and a good cinema. It also is home to some fascinating exhibits as well as a greenhouse space.

  5. A Alex

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    Lucky(for Luke Mullins, Waiting for Godot, 6 June 2015)River flows arched through human form,pulled, pulling, porter to place attended,a sole soul before thought, bound free.Meanders now, coursing drool, choreographall bar dance, rising slowly to static wave;a wail more beyond doubt that will not wait.Stream surges, words cascade. The facts are these.This is why we play. Flow and eddy own momentof each dart and stillness; for reasons unknown, resumed.Alan Coombe