1. Rob Collins

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    Readers of Steve Inskeep’s 2015 book “Jacksonland” should definitely visit. Beautiful and moving site.

  2. John Bruce

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    Exceptional experience. A must see for the History Buff. Site of one of the greatest battles in American history.

  3. Steve Markos

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    I am a writer and photographer for National Park Planner and I visited Horseshoe Bend National Military Park in August 2014. (By the way, the very nice photos posted here that look like they are from a place out west–if they are still up–are not of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park).Horseshoe Bend National Military Park preserves an 1814 Creek Indian War battlefield on which American forces under the command of General Andrew Jackson met in battle with 1000 Red Stick Creek Indians. The Red Stick Creeks were a faction of Creeks who opposed peace with the Americans, as opposed to the Lower Creek Indians who wanted peaceful relations. During the Battle of Horseshoe Bend, the Lower Creeks, along with the Cherokee, fought with the American army. Numbering 2000 strong, the Americans and their Indian allies easily overwhelmed the Red Sticks, killing nearly 800 and taking the rest prisoners. This victory effectively ended the Creek Indian War. Ironically, it was this battle and the defeat of the Creeks that helped Andrew Jackson to become President of the United States in 1829. It was Jackson who was behind the legislation to remove all Indians, including former allies, from the southeastern United States.The Horseshoe Bend National Military Park features a Visitor Center with a small museum that focuses on the Creek Indians and the battle that ended the Creek Indian War, an automobile tour of the battlefield that stops at five key positions, and a 2.7 mile Nature Trail. Two picnic areas and a boat ramp for launching canoes or kayaks are also within the park. Shore fishing is allowed from the boat ramp.For complete information on the park and plenty of quality photos, please visit National Park Planner (npplan).

  4. James Fletcher Robinson

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    My family settled near this place est time 1830.after Ala. became a state.General Andrew Jackson fought the 1st Americans (Indians) here in the Battle of Horseshoe bend which settled the Indian problem and allowed legal settlement.They came mostly via way of Georgia from Virginia with settlement in Tallapoosa ,Coosa counties.Dr.Peter Roger Robinson brought his family along with the Carlton family overland.to this area with other families around 1830.Dr Peter R.Robinson settled and built a home in Nixburg,Ala..He married Mary Ann Carlton in 1818 in Halifax,Virgina. They had eleven children..Dr Robinson father John Robinson was born in 1750 and was a member of the House of Burgesses and played a very important place in Virgina colonial Goverment.history.in Williamsburg.. His home and place of birth was Glouchester and Urbanna ,Virgina.The home place is over 350 years old and is still standing call HEWITT.in Urbanna virgina on the Chesapeek Bay.. My name is James F.Robinson. 15 times removed.

  5. Jason Brown

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    Drive thru battleground with 5 or 6 markers for stopping points describing the importance of the location. The size of the battleground puts in perspective how brutal this battle must have been. It’s really amazing to stand at the bend & picture what it must have been like so many years ago. I believe it is vital we perserve lands like this not just for historical importance but of the natural beauty displayed.