Historical Attractions

Historic Stagville Durham

Where is it at?

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Historic Stagville
5828 Old Oxford Road
Durham
NC
27712
Tel: 919 620 0120

Where are we going today?

There are some pretty incredible sites across the USA when it comes to history, but one of the most significant might be Historic Stagville, found in Durham, North Carolina.

Here, you will find the remnants of one of the largest plantations that existed of the pre-Civil War South. There is so much history there, if it was all in a book it would be an encyclopaedia! So kids, get ready to take a walk down history lane!

Historic Stagville was once owned by the Bennehan-Cameron family. Their combined holdings totalled around 30,000 acres of land by the time 1860 hit, and they owned around 900 slaves.

Today, the site is around 71 acres, in three tracts. There are a number of original structures still standing. These include two-story enslaved family dwellings, a framed timber barn, and even the Bennehan Family cemetery. 

Don't miss the late 18th century family plantation home either. Just imagine how it would have been to live there over a century ago. You can really gain an insight into the family through the artifacts that still remain, including family letters and documents.

It really is a fascinating view into the past, especially when it comes to the African American community. When you visit, you will be able to guide yourself, so you can take as little or as long as you need to really take it all in.

As well as self-guiding experiences, Historic Stagville also host a number of learning opportunities, so just when you thought you couldn't learn any more...you can!

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, so you know it really is a special place to visit. 

History is waiting in North Carolina, and when you visit, you will be joining their history too!

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How much does it cost?

  • AdultsFree!
  • ChildrenFree!
LAST UPDATED 2016

When can we go?

10am - 5pm Tues - Sat.

All year round.

Teachers corner

They LOVE to have students! It's such a fun way to learn about history, and allow students from 10am - 12pm Tues - Fri. Make sure you reserve a month in advance. They have programs you can choose from too.

I'm Hungry!

There isn't any food and drink available so feel free to take a picnic lunch!.

Healthy Eating!

The welcome center has bottled water. .

Any Top Tips?

Over summer, guided tours are offered at 11am, 1pm and 3pm. These last around an hour.

Need a little extra help?

All of the historic buildings are accessible. .

Can I get one of those?

There is a gift shop perfect for picking up souvenirs, and educational items on the family and property! The fun and learning can continue at home.

More information

Wear comfortable, sturdy shoes and dress for the weath.

What people are saying?

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    This is one of my favorite sites. Today, the emphasis was on trades. Someone was making bricks out of mud, clay, and sand and water. Some else was spinning cotton. Also, Dontavious Williams was there in his hand sewn garments, cooking over an open fire.

    It was a delightful and beautiful day and the staff were outgoing and friendly. I especially enjoyed speaking with Stephanie, the site manager, and Vera, an interpreter. They are both extremely knowledgeable and very talented at engaging visitor. I became a member today. I highly recommend...Read More

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    Went for a recent lantern-lit tour of Horton Grove slave quarters and great barn., so I'm basing this review on that event. That said, it was impressive enough to convince me to return to see the rest of Stagville.

    The guide, Vera, was extremely knowledgeably. She was also quite adept at parrying stupid questions and "I'm going to show how smart I am by repeating what you just told us" comments/questions. (You know the type of person I'm talking about...)

    The tour was an exceptional idea. As Vera pointed out, most visitors see the structures...Read More

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    Awesome

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Submit a review

by Dana Stone

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This is one of my favorite sites. Today, the emphasis was on trades. Someone was making bricks out of mud, clay, and sand and water. Some else was spinning cotton. Also, Dontavious Williams was there in his hand sewn garments, cooking over an open fire.

It was a delightful and beautiful day and the staff were outgoing and friendly. I especially enjoyed speaking with Stephanie, the site manager, and Vera, an interpreter. They are both extremely knowledgeable and very talented at engaging visitor. I became a member today. I highly recommend this place.

by John Ahlers

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Went for a recent lantern-lit tour of Horton Grove slave quarters and great barn., so I'm basing this review on that event. That said, it was impressive enough to convince me to return to see the rest of Stagville.

The guide, Vera, was extremely knowledgeably. She was also quite adept at parrying stupid questions and "I'm going to show how smart I am by repeating what you just told us" comments/questions. (You know the type of person I'm talking about...)

The tour was an exceptional idea. As Vera pointed out, most visitors see the structures during the day. However, the night hours give a truer view of what the enslaved population would have seen. Because days were for working in the fields, nighttime was when the enslaved population actually interacted and practiced a modicum of their own culture in and about the "houses."

The tour then visited the Great Barn, which lives up to its name. It's HUGE! Here Vera made another interesting point: the impressive structure was entirely slave built (including collecting the lumber, turning it into usable planks/beams, making the nails, etc) at a time when all things "negro" were being dismissed as inferior.

All in all, a nice little historical site with excellent staff!

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