1. Richard DePas

    0.0
    Your rating:

    We spent the entire day there. Tons to see and very interactive. Our son had a blast. Music centers have him a great experience playing drums, keyboards and guitars. Makes learning fun. Highly recommended for anyone remotely interested in music. They also had a cool exhibit about horror movies and the history of them. Cool props from them as well as a great sci-fi exhibit. Kids were having a blast in there. It’s a lot more than a cool looking building.

  2. Pablo Costa Tirado

    0.0
    Your rating:

    This is a very peculiar place. First of all looks like a museum for a certain profile of people that matched perfectly with me. SciFi, Terror, Fantasy, guitar player and music lover. The music section of the museum is specially focused on the Seattle history and the rise of grunge and contra culture movement.Is specially good the third floor where you can play different instruments.

  3. Stephanie Han

    0.0
    Your rating:

    I happened to glance into a Seattle Weekly during a recent trip and saw that this place was having a “Myth & Magic Faire,” which to me translated into: Renfair + mystical shit. I was sold! Since I’d never been to the EMP Museum before I figured this was as good a time as any to check it out. Located right next to the Space Needle, it’s that funky curvy multi-colored metal building–hard to miss. They had a “Fantasy” exhibit that coincided with the faire, as well as other exhibits dealing with sci-fi, horror, music and Legos! It’s kind of a geeky paradise, actually, and after noticing a lot of the props on display were from the “Allen Family Foundation,” I came to the conclusion that this place was basically Paul Allen’s geeky basement. Don’t know who Paul Allen is? He’s only the co-founder of Microsoft and the 53rd richest man in the world, which means he can afford to buy a LOT of Legos, movie props and guitars. And build a museum in which to house them. Deep pockets behind the museum mean top-notch displays and signage (as a graphic designer, I’m impressed by things like that), as well as some really cool props and state-of-the-art interactive exhibits, like the awesome monster shadow thing in the horror film exhibit. The Lego re-creations of skyscrapers from around the world was really cool, and that exhibit had an area for kids (or adults) to put together their own creations and take pics of them. The “faire” itself was only so-so since we could only make the daytime portion that was “family-friendly.” There was an archery area, some tables hosting Magic The Gathering games, etc. I have a feeling the midnight masquerade thing later on that night would’ve been epic, judging from the couple wandering around in full-body suits of armor, a very convincing hobbit and a puss in boots. Alas, we had a plane to catch. Also liked the Nirvana and Jimi Hendrix exhibits–also very well put together with lots of cool instruments and clothing on display. If you’re a fan of certain geeky pursuits (as I am), this is a must-see when you’re in Seattle. Also, if you buy your entrance ticket online ahead of time you get a few bucks off.

  4. David Nguyen

    0.0
    Your rating:

    Very unique exterior. Great for photos. At the moment, Nivanna and Jimi Hendrix are the primary exhibits. Very cool sound labs that allow you to learn/play different instruments.

  5. Doug Herring

    0.0
    Your rating:

    Loved this place so much that we blew off our other plans and spent the whole day there until they kicked us out at closing! The Kurt Cobain and Jimi exhibits were highlights, but the whole museum is great, and all of the music and videos that you can call up on demand are a fantastic component to the experience. The lunch we had in the cafe was good, too. What a great, fun day!