1. Scotty ST

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    This is a perfect place to visit during the anytime of the year. I love coming here in the Fall because its a beautiful time to come and the weather is not too hot. The entrance fee is $3 and the workers here are extremely nice. There are not too many farms in the Washington D.C. area and this farm is nearby and perfect for a day trip. The farm is not very big, so it is good for old people and young kids. The main crops on the farm are tobacco and corn. The corn and tobacco was harvested for the year so when you go now you won’t see too much of those crops. There are animals on the farm, such as pigs, chicken, and turkey. There is a cute little garden pig that you will see on the farm. The people working on the farm work on the farm and act as if they are in the 1700s. The people working on the farm reminded me of Colonial Williamsburg. The women I met who “lived” in the house were really nice and they showed me how to wash smoked meat. They provided me with a great amount of information on the farm, farming practices and what they do with the crops and animals they have on the farm.

  2. Christopher Moore

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    I took my kids to the park in November to fulfill a cub scout requirement. Great experience for the kids and it was also a learning experience for me. Having lived in the area for almost my entire life, I had never been to the park before. They established the park in celebration of the Bicentennial (1976) and the town of McLean decided to keep it going after the National Park Service decided they didn’t want it any longer. Really nice people actually living on the site in the manner people lived back in the 1770’s (raising turkeys, geese, chickens, cows, orchards & garden). They have their own natural spring and are really self sufficient.

  3. Brian Crouch

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    Google’s description of this place is inaccurate in one respect: “Management: U.S. National Park Service.” It is run by volunteers, funded by donations, privately administered. the NPS does not manage this farm.

  4. AJ Simkatu

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    This place is a living museum showing us a hint of what life was like 200 years ago. Yes, they slaughter animals here on site. If you wanted to live here years ago you slaughtered your own meat and ate it. The colonists weren’t a bunch of mamby-pamby vegans eating sprouts and fungus growing out of recycled garbage. They ate meat. Get over it. There’s nothing wrong with the clean and humane slaughtering of animals for meat.

  5. Michel Alexandre Salim

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    A secluded piece of 18th century farmland — with historically accurate costume and farming techniques — right next door to the CIA HQ!