National Parks / Natural World

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Fort Oglethorpe

Where is it at?

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Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
P.O. Box 2128
Fort Oglethorpe
GA
30742
Tel: 706 866 9241

Directions

CHICKAMAUGA BATTLEFIELD From Interstate 75: At Exit 350 take Battlefield Parkway (Georgia 2) west to Fort Oglethorpe. Turn left at the intersection of Battlefield Parkway and Lafayette Road. Go one mile on Lafayette Road to the park entrance and visitor center. From Interstate 24: At Exit 180 take U.S. Highway 27 south (Rossville Boulevard) to Fort Oglethorpe. At the intersection of Battlefield Parkway, continue straight through the intersection onto Lafayette Road to the park entrance one mile ahead. LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN BATTLEFIELD From Interstate 24: From Exit 178, turn left onto Broad Street. Broad Street will become U.S. Highway 41 (Cummings Highway). Turn left onto TN Highway 148. Continue on TN Highway 148 to the top of Lookout Mountain. At the top, turn right onto East Brow Road. The Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center is located at the end of East Brow Road, across the street from the Point Park Entrance Gate.

Where are we going today?

The 5,500 acre Chickamauga Battlefield, scene of the last major Confederate victory of the Civil War, contains numerous monuments, historical tablets, wayside exhibits, and trails. Major points of interest can be reached by following the seven-mile auto tour. The Visitor Center includes exhibits, a bookstore, and the Claud E. and Zenada O. Fuller Collection of American Military Shoulder Arms.
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When can we go?

All units of the National Military Park are open between sunrise and sunset.

What people are saying?

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    I am a travel writer for National Park Planner and I visited both the Chickamauga Battlefield and the Lookout Mountain Battlefield and related sites in Chattanooga in October, 2013. The Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park is the oldest military park in the country, established in 1895, nearly 21 years before the National Park Service was created. The park was created for the purpose of preserving both the Chickamauga Battlefield and the Chattanooga Battlefield for historical and professional military study. The two battlefields are...Read More

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    It's amazing to see during the fall time. just watch out for the deer. They are not afraid to run out in front of you.

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    Spent 5.5 hours here with the family and could have easily doubled it. So many monuments and so much beautiful scenery. Well worth the visit.

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    It's a great place to take your kids.

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    Our tour guide was very knowledgeable, it took us all day to finish the tour. Bring tenis shoes, drinks and comfortable clothing.. Overall awesome experience!!

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by Steve Markos

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I am a travel writer for National Park Planner and I visited both the Chickamauga Battlefield and the Lookout Mountain Battlefield and related sites in Chattanooga in October, 2013. The Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park is the oldest military park in the country, established in 1895, nearly 21 years before the National Park Service was created. The park was created for the purpose of preserving both the Chickamauga Battlefield and the Chattanooga Battlefield for historical and professional military study. The two battlefields are approximately seven miles apart.

Chickamauga Battlefield is near Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia and all attractions lie within one park boundary.

Sites at the Chattanooga Battlefield, on the other hand, are situated at various locations in the greater Chattanooga, Tennessee area. Park units include Point Park at Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Orchard Knob, the National Cemetery, Signal Hill, and the Moccasin Bend National Archeological District, which lies across the Tennessee River from the Lookout Mountain Battlefield. Today the District serves as a preserve of prehistoric to modern human history, but Moccasin Bend did see action during the battle for Chattanooga.

At the time of creation, very little had changed on the battlefields, so what you see today is pretty much the way it was in 1863, the year of the fighting. Most of the 1400 monuments and memorials on the two battlefields were placed during the first few years of the park’s existence.

As you tour the battlefields, either by car or on foot, you will find monuments, artillery, tablets, and information panels. Many of these lie far from the roadside stops and can only be seen by hiking or bike riding. Monuments are dedicated to various military units that fought in the battle, though there are a few dedicated to individual soldiers, all of these being placed by the soldier’s family. Monuments dedicated to military units were placed by surviving members of the unit and the state governments. Some monuments are simple markers, others ornate goliaths carved from granite or marble, often with metal sculptures and reliefs as part of the design. The monuments are located where the unit did its most memorable fighting. As you read the inscriptions on them, you are facing the direction in which the soldiers, themselves, were facing during the fighting (the monuments are thus facing away from the fighting).

Tablets also line the roads and trails throughout the park. The information on the tablets describes which unit was at the site at a particular time and date. Blue tablets describe Union positions and red tablets describe Confederate positions. Most of this information is of little interest to the average visitor, but remember, the park was created to document the battle for historians and military professionals. After you have read a few of them, you’ll find yourself spending more time looking at the monuments and won’t pay much more attention to the tablets…unless, of course, you are a Civil War fanatic.

Visits to the two battlefields can be made independently of each other, but if you want to stick to historical order, fighting began a Chickamauga, where the Confederates defeated the Union army, and then turned north to Chattanooga, where the Union army retreated after Chickamauga. Both battlefields have a Visitor Center where you can ask questions and get park driving and hiking maps.

Check out National Park Planner for complete information on both units of the park and nearly 350 photos (npplan).

The Weather

Wednesday

Conditions: Partly Cloudy
Temp: 87° F / 30° C
Humidity: 57 %
Wind: East - 0 MPH

Thursday

Conditions: Clear
Temp: 72° F / 22° C
Humidity: 55 %
Wind: NW - 11 MPH

Friday

Conditions: Partly Cloudy
Temp: 74° F / 23° C
Humidity: 60 %
Wind: W - 6 MPH

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