1. Abdulla Masum

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    Great experience. Good place to spent time with family’s. Fantastic way to teach kids about marine lives.Admission is expensive need to rethink about it also parking should be free.Just a quick advice please finish your meal before you visit this place in summer time unless you may have to waste valuable and expensive time to order foods from inside cafeteria.

  2. Chris Dias

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    I miss my aquarium. It was decades ago, and my favorites were a collection of freshwater sharks, which were not, I admit, real sharks. Then one day, for reasons I’ve lost since forgot, I stopped. The tank was placed into storage, and I’ve not had a pet since, nearly thirty years ago. Each time I wander into a pet store, I keep promising myself to get back into fish-keeping, but something always comes up. After two hours in the Vancouver Aquarium, the longing for a sucker-mouth catfish, or an Achilles tang, or even a butterfly koi became near uncontrollable. Yet, the Vancouver Aquarium presents a spectrum of various sea life I could never own at home. They have sea lions, salmon, and actual real sharks. They have tank after tank of jellies, and not the gummi variety, but largest growing segment of sea life on the planet. A somewhat frightening statistic—as our sea levels rise, as it’s temperature and salinity shifts dangerously, jellyfish are growing at alarming rate, pushing many of the animals we rely on for food and its relative industry out of their respective ecosystems. How interesting a coincidence then that jellies appear to dominant so many tanks at the Vancouver Aquarium. But they’re beautiful. Within darkened exhibits, the only illumination appears to come from their angelic, alien forms, certainly the source for any James Cameron film which doesn’t feature Arnold Schwarzenegger or Leonardo DiCaprio. And there are birds. Yes, no Aquarium would be complete without parrots and toucans. They also have sloths and monkeys. I guess the classification between zoo and aquarium depends on the ratio of animals behind two inches of transparent thermoplastic. There is an entire section dedicated to frogs, and I was confused which sounds were authentically generated and which were piped in pre-recorded. I know that read as overly negative, but I truly loved the Vancouver Aquarium, and not just because it has two different types of dolphins and otters that act creepily like people (“stop tapping the glass if its asleep—let it sleep”). Even the exhibit of sea monsters was interesting, a little creepy, and you can barrel through it in less than five minutes. And what would an aquarium be without penguins that clearly don’t want to be there? I still hope to return to fish-keeping at some point in life, especially considering that I don’t live in Vancouver and can’t return to the VA to meet my fix. It’s an absolute recommendation given the polish of its exhibits. One tank basically rises up and curves over your head, while many are cylindrical. They don’t discourage photography, though using the flash would be stupid to those dilesuinal enough to try it. The animal exhibits allow a level of proximity to encourage individual familiarity. You can stand inches away in hopes the animal will aknowledge you. Some zoos I’ve visited barely allow you to get within thirty feet. Would I go back? Perhaps, maybe in the future, but I do appreciate the VA exists and hope it will remain so for a very long time.

  3. Frederic Woodbridge

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    A wonderful experience all-in-all. Attractions are bright and inviting, good signage so the visitor is never unsure of where they are and want to go. There’s something lovely to see around just about every bend. Much better experience than the Seattle Aquarium, which should tell you something.

  4. Kelgie Sou

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    The Vancouver Aquarium does not take cetaceans (ie. dolphins, harbour porpoises, etc) from the wild. They have signed a treaty in 1996 stating that all cetaceans in the facility are deemed unreleaseable by the appropriate authority and / or were born in another aquarium and / or were there before 1996. Do your research before calling them inhumane lol.

  5. 19ARSENAL100

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    Don’t ever go to places like this if they have Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises etc, they have been ripped away from the wild, in a lot of cases, as young from their parents! Watch the documentary Blackfish, it’ll explain it perfectly. Seaworld the company that thinks it’s ok to do this is a disgraceful organisation. Don’t let these places profit from the suffering they inflict on these amazing creatures!!!!