Museums

Diefenbunker Canadas Cold War Museum Carp

Where is it at?

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Diefenbunker Canadas Cold War Museum
P.O. Box 466
3911 Carp Road
Carp
ON
K0A1L0
Tel: 613-839-0007

Where are we going today?

Built to protect the government from nuclear attack, this once-secret bunker is now a museum and National Historic Site of Canada.
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What people are saying?

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    Impressive. Symbol of human madness. Strange story about the super-proteced concrete vault for the Canadian gold that could never have been moved in-time...
    Chilling also to realize only the "elected few" and their staff were allowed to take shelter. The rest would have to perish...

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    Went for the first time today - after "planning to go" for about a decade - and man, what a disappointment!

    What a sad, pathetic excuse for a museum.

    First of all, it was filthy. Dirt and dust devils throughout the entire 4 levels, clumping up in corners and against the numerous desks and office chairs. Tiny office-sized garbage cans overflowing with snot-rags and candy wrappers. Nowhere near the standard other Ottawa museums have set.

    Then there was the craptacular props. At the behest of the staff, we started at the bottom and worked our way...Read More

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    Loved the museum itself, but thought that the kids birthday party being held during my visit to be disrespectful in the extreme and also dangerous. We shouldn't be teaching children that it's acceptable to run around and play tag at a historical site. It's a solemn place to learn about a particularly dark and disturbing part of our history - not a place for hide and seek.

    Even so, I enjoyed the museum enough to recommend it to anyone interested. Hopefully it won't be doubling as a playground during your visit.

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    Fun, scary

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    Well worth the time to drive out there. This National Historic Site is a step back in time to see and experience Canada's connection to The Cold War. It's still very authentic with very little altered or changed - right down to the 1960 style ashtrays, phone books, and nuclear blast radius maps and evacuation routes. Loved it!

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by Matt Ott

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Went for the first time today - after "planning to go" for about a decade - and man, what a disappointment!

What a sad, pathetic excuse for a museum.

First of all, it was filthy. Dirt and dust devils throughout the entire 4 levels, clumping up in corners and against the numerous desks and office chairs. Tiny office-sized garbage cans overflowing with snot-rags and candy wrappers. Nowhere near the standard other Ottawa museums have set.

Then there was the craptacular props. At the behest of the staff, we started at the bottom and worked our way up. The bottom is the pantry/galley. No word of a lie - they have cans and boxes of food with 8.5x11" printed logos from a desktop computer just taped and glued to them. Not even an ounce of effort put into accuracy or "museum quality".
There are MS Word spreadsheets in 3 ring binders on the quartermaster's desk that we're supposed to believe came from the 60s-80s.

A level above, in some of the situation rooms and other important offices, we see world maps and continental maps that have been pulled straight from National Geographic Magazines. Seriously, the maps said right on them "From the National Geographic Society for National Geographic Magazine", and they're still creased with the magazine sized fold lines. Are we really expected to believe that our Canadian Intelligence was so poorly funded it was forced to rely upon magazine freebies?

Pathetic.

The rooms all looked really good and realistic. They should, considering they really weren't changed much at the time of decommission. However, they do nothing to portray any real sense of what it may have been like when the bunker was staffed and operational.
I never had a clue that setting up some mannequins and a few flickering TV sets and running some ambient audio of hushed discussions, keyboard tapping, phones ringing, etc was so difficult or costly.
Failing that, they could have used a wall in each room to put up some large images of the rooms in action, allowing us to see how they were staffed and used. But nadda...

The Diefenbunker has the promise and potential to be one of our coolest and most interactive museums... but it falls flat on almost every count.

And much of it isn't opened to the public. We don't get to see any war planning, op center, armory, maintenance or boiler rooms. Or as my brother put it "any of the cool places".

It cost us nearly $65 for 4 adults... My suggestion would be to take that $ and go to dinner and google images from life in the Diefenbunker... you'll get way more value for your dollar.

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