National Parks / Natural World

Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park and Ayers Rock Uluru

Where is it at?

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Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park and Ayers Rock
Lasseter Highway
Uluru
NT
0872
Tel: 08 8956 1128

Directions

The national park are 450km away from Alice Springs. You can fly into the airport of Ayres Rock with Jetstar and Virgin Blue (from Sydney), or you can drive through the famous Red Centre!

Where are we going today?

You all know that famous image of that stunning red rock jutting out from the flat Australian desert? Of course it's Ayers Rock! Also know as Uluru, and part of the Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park (bonus points if you can pronounce that properly!)

The Central Australian desert otherwise being flat, Uluru and Kata Tjuta are spectacular rocks and domes that are millions and millions of years old! The image of Uluru has become somewhat of a national symbol for the entire country, and the Uluru and Kata Tjutu National Park has actually been recognised on the World Heritage List - pretty impressive! 

Your first stop will be the Cultural Centre, which is the perfect place to start learning about the Anangu culture and Anangu country.

For that little bit of extra information on the area, there are free ranger guided walks which run daily from the base of Ayers Rock. You journey along a shaded track (but take your hat and sunscreen anyway - it's the Australian desert!) where you learn about all the traditions and folklore associated with Uluru, including the traditional and modern Anangu life and culture. You may even spot some rock art!  The walk is about 90 minutes and is wheelchair accessible, so everyone can enjoy this magical experience!

Even though the Uluru and Kata Tjuta National Park is a desert, you of course might be able to spot some of the local wildlife! Can you spot those sweet little blue-tongued lizards, or the sneaky marsupial moles? Perhaps you might even spot the dingo! Be careful of snakes though - don't approach them!  (If you see the cute Spinifex Hopping Mouse, you don't have to be careful of them!)

You can also explore the area at your own pace (a common choice for families) where you can head to Alice Springs, Kings Canyon and the West MacDonnell Ranges all in the same trip. 

The nearby town of Yulara has been developed to offer accommodation, restaurants, petrol and supermarkets, so don't think you will be stranded in the middle of the desert! You might get stuck into dessert though, but not the desert. 

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How much does it cost?

  • Adults$25 for a three day pass
  • Free Under: 16 years.
LAST UPDATED 2014

When can we go?

Open at least 7am to 7pm.

Teachers corner

Schools and groups that want to visit the park and apply for an exemption to the entry fee must fill out the online form. But what a great school trip! .

Any Top Tips?

It's not prohibited to climb Uluru but there are really significant cultural reasons not to: PLEASE stop by the visitor centre first and ask why you shouldn't climb. It's an important message for the kids!.

Doing our bit

They charge visitors because it helps the park maintain the environment, and also part of the fee goes back to the Anangu traditional owners to help their families and communities. .

Can I get one of those?

While at the cultural centre visit their galleries and shops to support local Anangu artists who still live and work in the park. Make sure you don't take any of the rock away - it needs to stay there for millions more years! .

More information

Download their kids' activity book and learn all about the people, plants and animals that live around the park..

What people are saying?

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    Simply incredible. Horrified to find that people still climb up and down this beautiful landmark. The sunsets and sunrises were breathtaking. Once in a lifetime trip which i will never forget.

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    Very informative, and nicely laid out, although the Aussie bloke doing the voice over for the videos was hard to understand even for Australians! The art shop was full of beautiful things and the book full of 'sorry stones' was very interesting.

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    We visited the ROCK a few years back ... in our Camper .. (Zoe 89) .. it was all pretty good ... but what made the ROCK spectacular and beyond words .. it had rained overnight, mist covering over the ROCK in the morning, great view .. but the water falls down every crevice ... one of the greatest sights I have ever been privileged to see !! NOTE .. 3 photos at end photos under heading of "Google User"
    At a later date, July 2013 ... The ATT Kings day tours ...,,, This area is worth seeing. But NOT on a day trip....Read More

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    I've visited Uluru twice, once in 1990, and again in 2009. On that more recent trip, when I stepped out onto the tarmac at Ayers Rock Airport at midday local time, the first thing that struck me was intense colour and light. Glowing ochre earth, blue sky, pearl white ghost gums – and Uluru itself in the distance, dusky pink.

    Uluru, an iron-rich sandstone monolith arising from the heart of Australia, is sacred to the indigenous traditional owners, the Anangu. It tells their stories, it shows the actions of the Spirit Ancestors in their violent...Read More

Submit a review

by hitops61

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Once again I did not allow myself enough time at this once in a life time experience. When I explained to some people about my time in the outback they took the position that the outback had been turned into an amusement park. Nothing can be farther from the truth. The park services has taken precautions to not infringe on the natural eco-system and the culture of the indigenous peoples. The heat was oppressive, but if you know that going in you can prepare for it. If your into challenging yourself; you can get much out this part of the world.

by Ian Drinkwater

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We visited the ROCK a few years back ... in our Camper .. (Zoe 89) .. it was all pretty good ... but what made the ROCK spectacular and beyond words .. it had rained overnight, mist covering over the ROCK in the morning, great view .. but the water falls down every crevice ... one of the greatest sights I have ever been privileged to see !! NOTE .. 3 photos at end photos under heading of "Google User"
At a later date, July 2013 ... The ATT Kings day tours ...,,, This area is worth seeing. But NOT on a day trip. Friends recently took the day trip from the Rock to Kings Canyon, but was only TOLD when they got there that they (only 55 years of age and healthy) should not do the Canyon walk, they would only have 3 hours there. They were keen photographers. If they had known that before they would not have gone. One needs to stay at least a couple of nights, so that one can do the Canyon walk, leisurely. It is one of the most brilliant areas around. The Gorge walk, though shorter is great. The helicopter flight was again something different. DON'T be "short change" yourself, make sure you take time an enjoy it. P.S. My wife and myself have been there !!

by SC Skillman

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I've visited Uluru twice, once in 1990, and again in 2009. On that more recent trip, when I stepped out onto the tarmac at Ayers Rock Airport at midday local time, the first thing that struck me was intense colour and light. Glowing ochre earth, blue sky, pearl white ghost gums – and Uluru itself in the distance, dusky pink.

Uluru, an iron-rich sandstone monolith arising from the heart of Australia, is sacred to the indigenous traditional owners, the Anangu. It tells their stories, it shows the actions of the Spirit Ancestors in their violent conflicts during the Dreamtime, displaying evidence of their falls, their spear-thrusts, their lost shields. Uluru itself has a strong, brooding presence, which you begin to feel as soon as you see it, and which grows as you approach and gaze.

It speaks with its changing colours, amber, fiery red, deep brown, depending how the light falls upon it at different times of day, and its knife-edge shadows and fissures, flaking surfaces, indentations, pockmarks, wave-like effects, and most outstanding of all, the skull formation. On another level, it almost seems like a giant plasticine model which a giant has pressed his fingers into or dragged a comb down, or stippled and stabbed with a palette knife.

We caught the shuttle from the Yulara resort, planning to do the base walk. On the 9.2 kilometre trail around the Rock, it was evident that the number of fenced-off sacred areas had been increased since my last visit, pushing the path further out. And yet despite this, a walk around Uluru is full of marvels. The trees and shrubs are all much greener than you might imagine – the wattles, the fig trees, the desert bottlebrush. The aboriginal cave-paintings fill you with wonder, every experience defeats your expectations – none more so than the Mutitjulu Waterhole. We came upon it unexpectedly, tranquil and mysterious, the Rock’s multi-dimensional character reflected in its quiet waters.

The feeling I brought away with me after walking round the Rock was almost that of walking round a great and beautiful cathedral, imprinted with the devotion of many centuries. I can well understand how the Anangu revere the Rock, which has taken on an awesome spiritual power from the thousands of years of sacred ceremonies and teaching and story-telling centred upon it.

For me it is another of my places of inspiration: a vist here allowed me a deeper insight into the meaning of the aboriginal culture, enriching my own understanding.

I wholeheartedly recommend a visit there, for keen travellers. Uluru is like a jewel at the heart of Australia. The visitor facilities are also excellent in every respect.

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