1. Susan Bowes

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    Many years ago I visited a unique baffling phenomenon known as the “Mystery Craters”. As it has been almost 20 years since my initial visit, I thought I would return to see if the mystery of the craters formation had been solved.Not yet it seems; in fact this phenomenon is still baffling teams of international geologists to this day and the site has become known as an unsolved mystery of the World. The largest of the craters was discovered in 1999 which was part of a geological dig and samples were taken by Bundaberg University. Volcanic marbles were found which were similar to those located at an extinct volcano 2klms away.There are many theories which include: part of a meterorite, roof of a subterranean lake caused by oil pressure underground, result of sea action, sink holes from volcanic action or hot spring activity. However, so far not one of the World’s geologists can confirm the authenticity of any of these theories.Photographs on the walls inside the gallery show the property before 1971 when Mr Murrin’s plough got caught on something. The property was a small regional crop farm. Further investigation revealed a large foot-shaped hole of 18ft across which appeared to be lined with sandstone. Siltstone inside craters reveals a top surface mixture of sandstone and ochre with the ochre stain evenly distributed through the sandstone. Petrified wood was also found with fossilled worms inside. On some of the walls of the larger craters there are strange markings and notable recessed areas as if man-made. We were informed that a large hole was drilled 600 metres down, only to find that the ochre and sandstone formation remained evenly distributed all the way down.Oddities about these craters are that some hold water and some do not; they can dry out completely or fill up to the brim yet none is interlinked with the other. Some also contain minerals in which birdlife likes to drink and bathe. A tree stands above one crater and it is thought that if the crater were exposed the tree may die. Three craters remain covered in their original state; however there are 32 for you to view.Other displays of interest consist of a gift shop and gallery of rocks and minerals along with a shed full of old machinery.So is it worth the visit? Definitely! You may have some ideas yourself to unravel this amazing puzzle.

  2. ozgeek81

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    Went there in the 90’s. Complete rubbish and waste of money. Looks very fake. Crators formed in a square patch of land compared to nature’s own crators which can be anywhere.There is not even much to see other than see man-made holes shaped like ponds. I was like “come on mum lets go see more interesting things. I basically begged to leave and I’m sure you will feel the same the minute you step inside.

  3. Archie Quinn

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    The craters are more suited to people who want to see one of a kind things, UFO Space other planets etc, you see they are the only rock formation of its kind in the world, yellow and red ocher and sandstone bonded by heat, to date science has yet to determine the origin of the craters, whether a shower of meteors stuck an ancient ocean or river base and so on, the crater have some that have unmeasured depths, also an unknown phenomenon on land, not sure who the current owners are, but it was discovered by Owen Murrin whilst plowing a cane farm, he turned it into the tourist park. Had several Daughters I remember and a boy, one of them may be the current owners, unsure if it stayed in the family, worth a look if you like unique and unusual things

  4. A Google User

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    Hole … E … F@$k. There goes 9 minutes of my life I’m never getting back. Some slimy holes in the ground charged at $7.50.

  5. A Google User

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    A complete waste of time, don’t bother.