National Parks / Natural World

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park Mount Colah

Where is it at?

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Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park
Bobbin Head Road
Mount Colah
NSW
2079
Tel: 02 9472 8949

Directions

If you are coming from Terrey Hills or Church Point, just enter the park from McCarrs Creek Road. This will lead you to Liberator General San Martin Drive, where you'll find the picnic areas and facilities of Illawong Bay and Akuna Bay. It also gives access to West Head Road, West Head and The Basin.

Where are we going today?

Who's ready to get out into nature! We love just turning those computers and televisions off to spend a day with the family, checking out wildlife and enjoy the Australian wilderness! 

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is Australia's second oldest National Park (That's pretty impressive!) and has been a family favourite for years!

This park is located in Sydney's north, and really lets you feel completely immersed in nature so close to the metropolitan area of Sydney itself.

The Discovery Centre is a great area to start because you can chat to the friendly staff and really plan you trip, asking all the questions you might have. There is also a ton of fascinating information you can check out before you venture out into the park. There are displays on the Australian fauna, as well as Aboriginal heritage (which is very important to the region) as well as a 3-D slide show!

The Discovery Trail (which is wheelchair accessible) can start off your day with stunning views of Cockle Creek, where you might even spot local wildlife such as wallabies!

Then, your nature day begins! Explore and play around the winding creeks and check out where the stretches of ocean meet the rainforest! There are rock cliffs, eucalyptus and mangroves to enjoy too!

Fancy a spot of camping? Then head to The Basin where you can set up your family camp before taking on the walking tracks, mountain biking trails and incredible lookouts, as well as the significant Aboriginal sites. Take some time to get to know the history there!

You will still have plenty of time to enjoy the areas marinas, cafes, kiosks and of course picnic areas! Why not bring your own picnic and enjoy a family feast out with the wallabies!

If that wasn't enough, there are a ton of activities to keep the whole family entertained. Swimming, sailing, horse riding, fishing, cycling, and driving tours, as well as exploring the nearby Barrenjoey Lighthouse. There are a number of tour operators so there is always a good chance you will find one that match what your kids love.

After your time in the wilderness make the most of the marina’s great facilities and bring your picnic hamper!

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How much does it cost?

  • Adults$11 per vehicle per day parking.
LAST UPDATED 2014

When can we go?

Gates to Bobbin Head and Appletree Bay are closed from 8pm to 6am during daylight savings periods.

All year round. Park is open sunrise to sunset but may close due to poor weather or fire danger.

Teachers corner

All outdoor learning experiences are based on key learning areas and are led by experienced and knowledgeable Discovery Guides. Subjects can include National Parks, the Natural Environment and Cultural Heritage and all excursions are tailored to your individual lesson plans..

I'm Hungry!

The public barbecue and seating area is a lovely, family-friendly space with shaded tables. Or, if you feel like letting someone else prepare your breakfast or lunch, pop into the marina’s Akuna Cafe on the Bay. The Akuna Cafe is closed on Tuesdays..

Any Top Tips?

If you're arriving by bus or taxi you'll need to pay daily entry fees of $4.40 adults, $2.20 children..

Need a little extra help?

The Akuna Bay area is fully wheelchair accessible. Access is also available from the carpark to the Marina and Cafe, and there is a wheelchair accessible Discovery trail from the visitor centre. .

More information

Barrenjoey Lighthouse is reached by a 1km walking track. It's certainly worth it!.

What people are saying?

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    Our Family from 1947 to 1954 would spend our 6 week Xmas break camping at The Basin. It was a wonderful place to be as a child. Our family formed many long term friendships their, with families who came year after year. At Xmas, the community, would roast a pig and fish etc near the jetty with lots of Tooths Old and shandy for the wives. I remember our tent being flooded on several occasions when we had prolonged rain.

    I also remember my father and others would go out fishing and sometimes they would catch Hairtail (like a vicious big eel) which...Read More

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    It's so good n quit

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    beautiful national park with plenty to see and do

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    OK, been there? I go often, to work as a volunteer at Kalkari, Kuringai Chase road. If you want picnic? go. If you like calm and serenity, take a walk on any of lotsa tracks. If you want views go to West Head. Just be fire aware in spring/summer and check the fire rating signs.

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    Some beautiful bush walks showcasing the iconic Australian wide stretching hardy bushlands.

Submit a review

by Colin Glover

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Our Family from 1947 to 1954 would spend our 6 week Xmas break camping at The Basin. It was a wonderful place to be as a child. Our family formed many long term friendships their, with families who came year after year. At Xmas, the community, would roast a pig and fish etc near the jetty with lots of Tooths Old and shandy for the wives. I remember our tent being flooded on several occasions when we had prolonged rain.

I also remember my father and others would go out fishing and sometimes they would catch Hairtail (like a vicious big eel) which were quite tasty. We also used to use a putt putt boat to go round Broken Head to collect bags of magnificent rock oysters. Some of those journeys were almost disasters with the seas springing up unexpectedly.

You can imagine the camping equipment at that time was very rudimentary and heavy so the ferry was often rather overloaded as this was the only way to get there. In the basin part itself, was a large netted swimming area with a platform and springboard to show off to the girls.

All in all a rare treat to grow up in. And it seems that has continued for many others.

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